WTF

See, I don’t understand this. First of all, why are the police and the DA not able to adequately protect a witness so they feel safe testifying? More importantly, why is a witness necessary to prosecute someone? They have a crime scene, a motive, a suspect, evidence….why does a crime not exist in the DA’s mind if no one saw it? I am unaware of anywhere else in this country where you can shoot someone in the fucking head in the middle of the fucking day and as long as you can credibly threaten a witness, then you will not even go to trial for the crime.

This is why this city will not recover. This is why people are leaving. If we hang the Ray-Ray, Eddie, and chief Wiggum in Jackson Square I bet the next bastards in line for the jobs will try a little harder to prosecute. Just keep writing parking tickets for the revenue and don’t worry about the actual real crime fucktards….dumbest group of mother fuckers ever put in charge of anything.

FUCK!! FUCK!! FUCK!!

“Vote from the Roof!!!”

19 Comments so far

  1. Cade Roux (unregistered) on June 30th, 2007 @ 11:56 am

    Can’t they take a sworn deposition?


  2. roux (unregistered) on June 30th, 2007 @ 1:12 pm

    It was like this before Ray and his merry band got in office. Just look to people like Judge Elloie.

    A friend’s son is with Nat’l Guard in NOLA on night shift. He says it’s too boring and hot during the day. He says that the thugs will shoot at them. What kind of idiots are they? The NG are carrying real weapons and will shoot back.

    I don’t know how anything other than Marshall law can bring law and order to NOLA.


  3. Paulp (unregistered) on June 30th, 2007 @ 4:30 pm

    I heard this on wwl while driving in. I could not believe how fucked up this is. Now this douchebag gets to walk around in my town with no consequences.

    I don’t have a gun, but if this shit keeps up I have to think people will begin to start taking the law into their own hands.

    The only problem is, you would be doing the city a favor, but you would get prosecuted and go to jail for 30 years. Fucked up shit all across the board.

    Marshall law is right. I don’t give a shit if they search me, I’m not a criminal and I have no reason to worry. Bring it on. Search me every fucking day I don’t care. Search everybody. Put a fence up at the 610 split and search the fucking cars for guns and drugs just like they do at the Mexican Border.

    Viva La Revolucion!

    It will be Bastille day all over again.


  4. Paulp (unregistered) on June 30th, 2007 @ 4:30 pm

    I heard this on wwl while driving in. I could not believe how fucked up this is. Now this douchebag gets to walk around in my town with no consequences.

    I don’t have a gun, but if this shit keeps up I have to think people will begin to start taking the law into their own hands.

    The only problem is, you would be doing the city a favor, but you would get prosecuted and go to jail for 30 years. Fucked up shit all across the board.

    Marshall law is right. I don’t give a shit if they search me, I’m not a criminal and I have no reason to worry. Bring it on. Search me every fucking day I don’t care. Search everybody. Put a fence up at the 610 split and search the fucking cars for guns and drugs just like they do at the Mexican Border.

    Viva La Revolucion!

    It will be Bastille day all over again.


  5. Robert Sutton (unregistered) on June 30th, 2007 @ 11:10 pm

    why does a crime not exist in the DA’s mind if no one saw it?

    I witness therefor it was???
    No one witnessed therefor it wasn’t???

    I want to meet the witness who was watching the big bang. I bet they were really, really, really small and hot.


  6. Jim Gardener (unregistered) on July 1st, 2007 @ 5:37 am

    Jack’s right if our legal system fails us its our resposibility to serve up a plate justice the old fashion way


  7. jack Ware (unregistered) on July 1st, 2007 @ 11:01 am

    And then there’s this bullshit So apparently, even if the entire situation is video taped, Jordan can’t hold his shit together. I’m not saying if people are innocent or guilty but I will say that given the situation there should be some decisiveness on the part of the DA.

    Also, Roux, I blame the current administration because they’re responsible for the current state of things. They may not have created it, but they’re allowing it to continue. Nothing was done to their predecessors so it continues. If we don’t find a way to demand a change then the next administration will allow it to continue as well. And I don’t think cute “silence is violence” signs in the neutral ground and little protests outside City Hall is forceful enough. I appreciate that someone did something, anything really, but we really need to consider more forceful means.

    The DA should be removed from office. Chief Wiggam should be fired. If the mayor can’t get the crime situation under control then he should be removed from office. In short, whatever needs to be done to correct the crime problem should be done. If the mayor doesn’t have the authority to do certain things then he should go to the state for help and so on. The City Council should not only support the mayor’s efforts, but come up with their own approach to do what they can to correct shit.

    And I still haven’t gotten an answer on my original question: Is there something in the law that won’t allow the DA to prosecute without an eye witness? I haven’t heard anything from Jordan as to why he’s dropped the case other than because there’s no witness. What about physical evidence? And I don’t want to hear that shit about not having a crime lab – that’s a bullshit excuse.


  8. roux (unregistered) on July 1st, 2007 @ 11:21 am

    If it weren’t for the Feds and NG it would even be worse. The FBI and Justice Dept are doing a pretty good job where they can.

    Eddie Jordan is a total dumbass but many DA’s are. It’s their ADA’s that usually make the difference and of course Eddie couldn’t stand having too many white ones.

    It starts in NOLA but goes to the legislature, Atty Gen and Gov. They should have been working to change some laws to allow better law enforcement in NOLA. Non of those groups has helped. The only thing Gov Blanco has done and I commend her for it , is sending in the NG and State Police.

    I understand that Richard Eyoube(sp/) tried to do some things to help get the judicial system on track but I’m not sure how much success he had.


  9. Please (unregistered) on July 1st, 2007 @ 11:54 am

    It’s “martial” law, folks.


  10. Ann (unregistered) on July 1st, 2007 @ 11:56 am

    As far as I know, there is no requirement of eyewitness testimony. It does help, though. They could have gone forward without her, or read her statemnts into evidence, under certain circumtances. But that would bring up a 6th Amendment issue of facing his accusers, thereby giving the slime a opening for an appeal. Maybe that’s why they didn’t go ahead. They still have the option to refile charges, but still.

    I would put so much pressure on that mother – they can compel the girl to testify as a hostile witness, but that’s a last resort and would only reinforce the perception of the judicial system as the enemy.

    Based on what I’ve read about it, I concur with Jack that the DA is spineless eclair.


  11. jack Ware (unregistered) on July 1st, 2007 @ 3:49 pm

    A friend of mine suggest to me that the DA might have dropped the charges based on past experience that suggests he can’t get a jury conviction without an eye witness and he doesn’t want to risk a not guilty verdict. That’s the best theory I’ve heard so far.

    But that makes the problem impossibly big. It backs up what I’ve said before that the community is will, and even expects a certain amount of crime and that that’s acceptable. Combine that with a general distrust of the police and the government and you’ve got a community that puts the burden of proof so high that it is no longer based on reasonable doubt. The system completely breaks down at that point.

    I am tired of hearing from the police and the DA that they can’t do it alone and that the community needs to be more involved. So at least if he takes shit to court with a good case then he has some grounds to make that claim. Plus, the DA can always then appeal the verdict and take it to a higher court right? At least at that point he would have statistical evidence that the people of New Orleans are unwilling to convict.

    I have no idea how to prompt the cultural change that would make the people feel that no level of crime is acceptable. But the first thing that has to happen is for everyone to understand that if you commit a crime you will be convicted and you will go to jail. Right now, no one in New Orleans believes that. The last statistics I saw shows that of the 250 or so murders in 2006, there’s only one conviction. And that, no matter what the cause, is completely unacceptable. So I stand by my assertion that if the people who’s job it is to find and convict criminals can’t do the job, then we need to get rid of them and keep going through people until we find someone who can. This is not a common problem in the united states so there has to be a better way to do shit.


  12. jack Ware (unregistered) on July 1st, 2007 @ 9:21 pm

    I don’t mean to crap on the girl not testifying or anyone for not testifying – that isn’t my point. The point is, the city should be able to protect witnesses and their family as necessary and ensure their safety so it isn’t a stupid idea to testify.

    More to the point, why is a murder conviction contingent on a scared 15 year old girl. There isn’t another way to get the conviction? Other forensic evidence and such.


  13. Editor B (unregistered) on July 2nd, 2007 @ 8:55 am

    The son of a woman I work with was murdered. The witness was put under protection from the DA’s office. The person assigned to protect this witness tried to rape her. I think that says a lot about the level of dysfunction.


  14. Jack Ware (unregistered) on July 2nd, 2007 @ 9:17 am

    I hear stuff like that all the time Editor B, and I’m always cautious of them if I can’t find a substantial secondary source. But ultimately that’s beside the point because if these stories are floating around and are true then there’s something wrong in the police department and the police can’t be trusted. If the stories are floating around and aren’t true then it’s because there’s a significant perception that the police can’t be trusted which has the same effect as if they were true. At least if the stories aren’t true there aren’t any victims.

    I heard on the radio this morning there was a spat of crime over a 24 hour period this weekend but I couldn’t find any details. I wonder if there’s a relationship between the charges in a pretty visible case being dropped and the up tick in crime? Like maybe Eddie’s message that “I can’t do my job” was received loud and clear by the criminal element. Probably just a coincidence.


  15. Jack Ware (unregistered) on July 2nd, 2007 @ 9:24 am

    Ah, here’s a wrap up of the weekend’s festivities: Reads like a war diary


  16. Jack Ware (unregistered) on July 2nd, 2007 @ 10:14 am

    New Orleans Police say ”good, honest, law-abiding citizens who are not involved in illicit activity…[are] pretty safe.”

    Today’s opinion poll on WWL

    I suppose you could argue that point if you really wanted to. But isn’t it kind of an ignorant thing for the police to say? The police are obligated to protect everyone, not just “good, honest, law-abiding citizens”. It’s a cheap cop-out.

    I mean if I say something like that on here it’s just one little asshole talking shit. When the police say it, it could be interpreted as a statement of policy. I’m not the most compassionate person when it comes to criminals, but I do think they should be afforded some level of safety.

    Furthermore, is that 15 year old witness a “good, honest, law-abiding citizen”? I don’t know, but I’m sure she doesn’t feel safe either way.


  17. KMAN (unregistered) on July 2nd, 2007 @ 1:50 pm

    What’s really painful to see here is that while this conversation started out about the DA’s failure to keep a case together, it has naturally evolved to include the police. The fact that BOTH divisions of our criminal justice system are obviously and woefully inadequate makes improvement to either group more difficult, as neither can really rely on the other. Additionally, the numerous announcements concerning “a new plan to work more closely with [the other group] which should result in more convictions” indicate that even if one of these two “branches” of the CJ system were functioning in an exemplary manner, the communication between them is probably poor enough to inhibit optimized cooperation.

    The community’s apparent refusal to participate in the conviction process, coupled with the maddening ineptitude of our “Three Stooges” city administration, make for a situation that is going to require some major impetus to break its inertia. As it stands now, all parties seem to be in breach of our social contract. Is it possible that our government (even at the municipal level) is a direct reflection of our consent and desire to be governed? Does our city have a criminal justice system that closely mirrors its own commitment to law and order? Scary thought.


  18. Jack Ware (unregistered) on July 2nd, 2007 @ 3:58 pm

    Very well said KMAN. I think you’re exactly right in the CJ system we have reflects how we as a city want it to work. At one of our neighborhood meetings a neighbor brought up the suggestion that for our night out against crime we invite people from Central Lockup to join us and have food and drinks since she’d heard things in CL were pretty rough right now. I couldn’t believe what I was hearing. I mean I can see doing something nice like that for the victims of crime but not for the accused.

    I’ve repeatedly heard my neighbors defending the scum that walk around there all the time….”awe, he’s a good kid”. In one case I responded, well his pistol fell out of his pants onto the sidewalk outside my front door yesterday. All I got was a denial shrug and a reiteration that he’s a good kid. Good kid? He’s a 30 year old drug dealer. There’s a sincere refusal to admit that your kids or the kids that grew up in your neighborhood are just simply bad people. How many times does the community rise up saying, “he was such a good kid, quiet, never bothered no body” ignoring the police record including in some cases convictions and suspicion of several counts of murder? William Jefferson is the ultimate expression of that refusal to separate the crime from the individual.

    Another way to look at it is that there’s such a distrust in the government that accusations of criminal activity, however obvious, are ignored based on where the accusations come from. I can almost give people that one.

    If this system really is a reflection of what the people of New Orleans expect or even want then the whole situation is suddenly hopeless. In the words of a very good friend of mine, “It makes it very easy to think about leaving”. But more than that, it makes it harder and harder to justify staying.

    And people just tell me its because I’m not from here so I don’t understand….which I can’t help but think is a huge insult to people from here if that’s true.


  19. Hannah (unregistered) on July 5th, 2007 @ 4:57 pm

    Upon first moving to NoLa more than 13 years ago, I asked my husband (born and raised in NoLa) “what is so great about NoLa?” His response was, “you can do anything in NoLa; you can shoot someone in the face and get away with it.” At the time I thought he was joking. After living in the city for more than a decade, I learned he was not. He was more right than I ever wanted to admit to myself.



Terms of use | Privacy Policy | Content: Creative Commons | Site and Design © 2009 | Metroblogging ® and Metblogs ® are registered trademarks of Bode Media, Inc.